What is Reporting Time Pay?

What is Reporting Time Pay?

“Reporting time pay” is defined as partial compensation to employees that go to work expecting to work a certain number of hours but are deprived of working the full time due to inadequate scheduling or lack of notice by the employer. The amount the employer must pay the employee is determined by the following two provisions:

For every workday that an employee is supposed to work, but is not allowed to work or is only able to work less than half of their scheduled work time, the employee must be paid for half the scheduled work day. The employee may not be paid for less than two hours or more than four hours of their scheduled day’s work. The employees must be paid at their regular rate of pay.

If you, as an employee are required to go to work for a second time in one workday, and work less than two hours, you must be paid for two hours of work at your regular pay rate.

If your employer does not pay reporting time pay, you may file a reporting time pay wage claim in California to recover lost wages.

Example:

Jane works at a factory in California. One day she showed up to work only to have her boss send her home after a few hours due to over scheduling. Jane was scheduled to work an 8-hour shift, however only worked a 2 1/2 hours. Even thought Jane didn’t complete her shift, she is still entitled to “reporting time pay” which is partial compensation for when employees show up to work and are relieved of their duties due to scheduling conflicts or miscommunication by the employer. Jane must be paid for half of her regular scheduled work day at her normal rate of pay, which is 4 hours at $10 per hour. If Jane isn’t compensated for reporting time pay she may file a reporting time pay wage claim in California.

If you have a question about California reporting time pay law or want to file a reporting time pay wage claim> in California, contact Strauss Law Group now.